Category: Windows 8


A customer had just upgraded to Windows 8.1 and after he did, the computer would no longer boot. A blue screen appeared, in same color as the Windows 8 blue screen of death, but with white lines and blocks instead of anything readable.

Some drivers do not upgrade properly to Windows 8.1. An often overlooked driver is the one the antivirus program uses. The ultimate problem was the version of McAfee that came with the computer was not compatible with Windows 8.1. (Not that I was surprised that McAfee was the cause of problems.) I had to remove McAfee in safe mode. Continue reading

Now this is a difficult problem. I have a customer with Windows 8 who could not activate Windows. The primary problem was a HP computer with the product key embedded in the UEFI. (Which means, of course, no product key sticker. One of my many reasons to hate Windows 8.) Everything I tried to activate Windows failed. I even used a Magic Jellybean keyfinder to recover the product key.

Before you start the repair process, be sure you have the Windows 8 product key.

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Sometimes in Windows when you log in, you will get this message: “Windows cannot load the user’s profile but has logged you on with the default profile for the system”. The cause of this message is one of the user specific files has become corrupted. Chances are good that user’s registry hive is corrupted. There are several hidden files in the folder c:\users\[username]\ folder (Windows Vista and later) or c:\documents and settings\[username]\ folder (Windows XP and earlier). Hereafter in this blog post we will call these directories [old user].

Chances are good you won’t be able to fix this problem.

  • Try System Restore first, but be sure to choose a restore point several days before the problem occurred.
  • If that does not work, try your backup next, if you have one.
  • If that does not work, then you will need to create a new user. Below are the steps you need to take to migrate to a new user.
  1. Create a new user and log in to that new user. Do not open any programs just yet. And do not delete your old profile until you are absolutely sure everything has been copied.
  2. Browse to the new user’s folders, c:\users\[new user]\ or c:\documents and settings\[new user]\, hereafter called just [new user].
  3. Copy all the non-hidden files and folders from [old user] to [new user].
  4. After that finishes, browse to [old user]\appdata\local\ (Windows Vista or later) or [old user]\local settings (Windows XP or earlier). If you want, you can copy everything from this folder to the corresponding folder in your new user profile. It probably is a good idea only to copy folders from Microsoft or programs you currently have installed.
  5. Next browse to [old user]\appdata\roaming\ or [old user]\local settings\application data\ and copy those folders to the corresponding folder in your new profile.
  6. Log off and then log back in.
  7. See if your settings transferred. You might have to set up your email again. And that means you will might need to Google the location of the old email files and how to import them.

If the Master Boot Record (MBR) or partition information has been damaged by a virus, Windows will not boot. Variants of the TDSS rootkit, for instance, will infect the MBR and remove the system and active flags on all partitions. The purpose of that is to make sure the boot process must active the TDSS rootkit. You’ll know this has happened when all you get is a flashing cursor when attempting to boot from the primary hard drive. It can be easily fixed with the Windows 7 DVD. This process is easier with the Windows 7 DVD than with the Windows 8 or Windows Vista DVD. This solution only works if the hard drive has a MBR. The MBR replacement, GUID Partition Table (GPT), requires a computer with the UEFI instead of the BIOS. GPT is more secure than the MBR.

UPDATE: Please note that newer CPU’s are incompatible with Windows 7, and thus incompatible with the Windows 7 disc. So you may have to use the Windows 10 disc instead. The process is still the same, just not as easy.

  1. Boot into the Windows 7 DVD and choose Repair Your Computer.
  2. Startup Repair may run, if it does, let it fix the problem. If it doesn’t, then run startup repair immediately. Then immediately reboot back into the Windows 7 DVD.
  3. Open a command prompt.
  4. If using Windows Vista or later, run the following commands:
    chkdsk c: /f /x (NOTE: The Windows DVD may have the Windows partition another drive letter. Make sure you use that drive letter.)
    bootsect /nt60 sys /force /mbr

    bcdboot c:\windows /s c: (NOTE: The Windows DVD may have assigned the Windows partition another letter. Use the drive letter Windows assigned for c:\windows.)
    diskpart
    select disk # (use the list disk command to get a list of drives and use the # of the boot drive.)
    select partition # (use the list partition command to get a list of partitions on this drive and choose the partition with Windows on it, likely the largest.)
    active
    exit
  5. If using Windows XP or earlier, use the same commands except replace /nt60 with /nt52 in the bootsect command and do not use bcdboot.
  6. Reboot and run TDSSKiller.

So here is a problem I encountered. A computer would not connect to the internet. The first thing I do is, of course, run the ipconfig command. This showed that it wasn’t getting an IP address from the router. So I tried to open the command prompt as an administrator, but all I got was a message saying “The specified service does not exist as an installed service” along with something else below it related to the action I was trying to perform. Whenever I tried to run anything as an administrator, I got this same message: “The specified service does not exist as an installed service“. Continue reading

Why I Hate Windows 8

This entry has been updated for the 10th time. Last update was 10/7/2014.

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